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brain injury Archives

Brain trauma in Pennsylvania

Until recently, Pennsylvania physicians have relied on magnetic resonance imaging and computerized tomography scans in order to determine the severity of brain trauma. The traditional images only supply a part of the picture when cerebral injury occurs, though, as they are effective in detecting intracranial bleeding but have no way of pinpointing cellular damage. However, medical researchers have developed a diagnostic blood test that isolates a specific protein in the brain that can help provide information about the extent of a person's injury.

Harvard study suggests possible future cure for brain injuries

Imagine a pill or injection that doctors could give to people right after they suffered a head injury in a car accident, in battle or on the sports field that would protect them from long-term effects. This wonderful idea is years away from becoming a reality, but a new study from Harvard suggests that scientists are a step closer.

4 common myths about brain injuries

Traumatic brain injuries have received a great deal of media attention in the past couple of years, especially in regards to athletes and soldiers. Of course, you don’t have to be on the football field or in a war zone to suffer a brain injury. They can happen in traffic, at work or during many other activities.

Rare brain injury disorder turns victims into savants

By now, most of us are familiar with the most common symptoms of a head injury, even those of us fortunate enough never to experience serious brain trauma. Media coverage of concussions has educated the public to the headaches, nausea, cognitive impairments and emotional problems common to many sufferers.

What is a concussion?

Concussions are a big news subject these days, as the long-term effects of blows to the head for athletes and troops in war zones have come increasingly to light. But readers who have never experienced one may not know exactly what experts are talking about when they refer to concussions. What is a concussion and how does it affect the human brain?

Lives of families of brain injury victims also change

A severe brain injury usually affects more than the person who sustains it. Most people have family, like a spouse, children or parents, whose lives also change. They do not suffer from the symptoms of a TBI, but they must now live with a loved one who may be permanently disabled.

Smell test may detect brain injury

Doctors and researchers are always looking for faster and more accurate tests for possible brain trauma. The sooner a victim of traumatic brain injury can be diagnosed, the sooner he or she can begin receiving treatment, which may reduce his or her symptoms and the injury’s long-term effects.